It’s not magic, but the results can be magical

You might think that since I’m both a professional dog trainer AND a professional photographer, that it’s relatively easy to get a nice picture with all my dogs. You would be wrong. It is comical how difficult it is to pose my dogs. Surprisingly, Frances was pretty easy, although she likes to roll over on her back, or give random kisses (cute!), or initiate play with Vesta. Luna is tricky because as a senior dog it’s harder for her to sit, lie down, get up, etc. And she’s careful with her space and her balance, so if anyone brushes against her or gets too close, she tends to move (- my hand is on her back to reassure her that even though Frances’ foot is touching her, no one is going to step on her or move suddenly). Vesta doesn’t like to be in between anyone. And only likes to position herself in certain places/ways, and will get nervous/suspicious if you try to guide her too much (– notice that I’m *not* touching her). And she’s overall quite impatient with tasks if I’m not paying her well enough and quickly enough. Thanks to knowing their particular likes/dislikes & quirks, and being willing to work with those and not force things, and thanks most of all to Jess Gibson (my employee and a talented professional photographer in his own right) and his patient help and camera skills, we got our desired image at last. But you should have seen the process, and the outtakes! Hmmm, too bad I don’t know any dog behavior experts who could help train posing and condition the dogs to enjoy it… oh, wait…
 
I take lots of un-posed photos, but we all sometimes want something a little more posed, and I share this story to let people know that with a little knowledge, patience, and some good camera skills, a professional pet photographer can create images that will show off any dog in their best light, looking natural and happy, both posed and un-posed. 

me with Vesta, Frances, and Luna

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